Zero Waste Europe Strategic Framework 2022-24

Europe is in the midst of a transition and zero waste is part of it.

Ten years ago, the concept of zero waste was laughed at. Today, zero waste is mainstream, from being considered a practical approach to implementing a circular economy to a trending lifestyle globally. The efforts from civil society groups in Europe and around the world pushed the debate higher in the waste hierarchy. If at any time over the last twenty years reuse and prevention had a chance, it is now. And ZWE is committed to bringing that change forward.
From a content perspective, for the next 3 years, we will focus on bringing IN incentives and funding for the transition, phasing OUT toxics, lifting UP reuse, pushing for BETTER recycling and bringing waste disposal DOWN.

Our Strategic Framework for 2022-24 outlines the ZWE roadmap and goals for the coming years, with the ultimate aim of helping us achieve a zero waste future for Europe (and for the world, while we’re at it).

 

Available in English.

The Catalan law on food loss and waste prevention

In March 2020, The government of Catalonia adopted a pioneering law aiming to reduce food waste and loss. Unlike many pieces of legislation, the Catalan law focuses on all steps of the food supply chain and seeks to promote food waste prevention, rather than encouraging food donation. This is carried out through various obligations for stakeholders across the supply chain on the adoption of specific measures, thus including the primary sector.

Lithuania’s law for donation of food waste

In September 2016, Lithuania passed a law that aimed to reduce food waste by easing donations for charity purposes. The law clearly defines that food products past their “best before” deadline are still suitable for donations and gives clear guidelines on how for a safe process. Additionally, the Lithuanian law allows a deduction of up to 40% of tax profits if acting under the Charity law.

Zero Waste Europe Network

How big is Zero Waste Europe Network? How many are we? and what Network means in a broader sense? Find it out in our new infographic!

 

Available in English

FAQ on COVID-19 and zero waste

Zero Waste Europe analyses the impacts of COVID-19 on zero waste and suggests what can be done to keep working toward a zero waste future.

Available in English, Czech & Italian.

The story of Pontevedra

Thanks to decentralised composting the province of Pontevedra went from providing no options for bio-waste to a comprehensive and community-based system, establishing itself as a best practice example for bio-waste management in Spain and beyond.

Available in English & Spanish

The story of Bruges

After assessing that 750 000 kg of food were wasted every year, the city of Bruges lauched anambitious Zero Food Waste strategy. Becoming a European forerunner with 43% of Food Waste prevented in the Healthcare sector.

The Story of Sardinia

Fifteen years ago Sardinia was Italy’s worst performing region in waste management. Today, it is the best performing island in the Mediterranean. Who said Zero Waste cannot work in tourist destinations?

The Story of Besançon

Located in Eastern France, the city of Besançon has rolled out an extensive system of decentralized composting, managing to cover 70% of its population and to significantly reduce the waste sent for disposal. Learn how they did it!

The Story of Roubaix

Lacking the power to implement waste collection and management practices, Roubaix had to find new ways to transition to zero waste. The Town is addressing waste at source, by creating a vibrant constellation of actors committed to reducing their waste, including families, schools and businesses.

The Story of Parma

In the North of Italy, the City of Parma presents a vivid example of a transition from traditional waste management to Zero Waste in only 4 years. The key for their success: political will, involvement of civil society and a strategy based on minimising residual waste.

The story of Gipuzkoa

The province of Gipuzkoa, in Spanish Basque Country, has managed to almost double their recycling rates in 4 years. In 2011 they struggled to meet EU targets and now they are above the 2020’s goals and intend to keep improving.

Gipuzkoa still has a long way till Zero Waste, but is already proving that laggards can move very quickly. Do you want to know how?

The story of Ljubljana

The Slovenian capital is the first capital in Europe to declare the Zero Waste goal and in 2014 separately collected 61% of its municipal waste. The city has committed to halving the amount of residuals and increasing separate collection to 78% by 2025.

How did Ljubljana manage to become EU’s best performing capital when 10 years ago had barely started implementing separate collection?

The Story of Contarina

The public company Contarina serves the districts of Priula and Treviso in Northern Italy, the best performers in waste prevention and recycling in a wide area in Europe. What is the secret for Contarina to recycle two times the European average and generate five times less residual waste? This and more you will find out in this case study

 

The story of Vrhnika

In a country that until 2001 had no national targets for separate collection of waste, the case of the small municipality of Vrhnika in Slovenia shows how a community can make strides towards a Zero Waste objective in a short time.

How did this small area go from landfilling everything to recycling most of its MSW in 20 years?